Are Border Collies Good with Other Dogs? (Inc Expert Advice)

We all know that Border Collies are super smart, fun-loving, and very hard working, but just how good are they with other dogs?

Keep reading to learn:

  • The other breeds that are best for border collies
  • How to stop a Border Collie from herding other pets
  • Having 2 Border collies together
  • much more!
Border collie and other breeds in an image all sitting down staring at the camera. A total of 5 dog in this image.

Border Collies are generally good with other dogs and people. Although you may find they tend to herd other dogs or generally not take much interest in playing with them. Working dogs in most instances totally obsessed with their master and nothing else, which is subject to how the dog was raised as a puppy.

What's In This Guide?

      Do Border Collies Get Along With Other Dogs?

      Whilst being known as one of the most obedient breeds on the planet to humans, Border Collies can be very aggressive towards other dogs perceived as a threat. That said, this is totally dependant on the way your dog was raised and the experiences they have had.

      My friend Cathryn owns a Border Collie, German Shepherd, and Chow Chow! of which she clearly says all get along just fine. One thing to be aware of is a Border Collies need for herding as this comes naturally and can become unsafe when left near puppies or small children.

      What do the professionals say?

      I decided to take things a little further and find out what breeds a professional veterinarian would recommend for pairing up with a Border Collie.

      The first vet I spoke to was over on a website called JustAnswer where Dr.Kelly advised that I pair my Border Collie with any breed that matches her personality. Whilst a little generic I certainly would agree that this is the best approach to take.

      She advised me that this answer does not need to be breed-specific, but instead based on each dog. I was then asked how old my dog was in which. stated 18-months of age and very energetic.

      If you’re wondering if I gave her a fictional story then YES you are right, but I wanted to get an honest answer and save the hassle of explaining that hr answers were to help me write the blog post.

      Agility training was what she recommended to help a Border collie become more obedient. Although I feel there is better training for this breed, such as obedience training, especially for helping your dog socialize with others.

      Here is a quick snapshot of how the conversation went;

      snapshot of my conversation with a professional vet on the best breeds to pair up with a Border Collie

      The second vet I spoke with was from Petcoach.com where I asked pretty much the same question (at a fee) and was able to get a quick answer of recommended breeds.

      This was a little more interesting as the vet (David Elbeze) gave me a much different answer from Dr.Kelly. He instead recommended that I go for breeds such as a Golden Retriever Or Labrador.

      It totally made sense too, as Golden Retrievers and Labs generally have a happy-go-lucky attitude that encourages a positive playful manner with other pets. Who in their right mind wouldn’t want them as a lovely addition to the team?

      Here is a snap of that answer from Dr.Elbeze

      snapshot of conversation with professional vet from Petcoach.com. His name was Dr.Elbeze and he answered my question on the best breeds to natch with a Border collie at home

      After speaking with both of the vets and gaining a general understanding of how to go about this choice, I was able to put together a list of the best companion breeds that I believe will gel with a Border Collies typical personality.

      Note: You may find that other breeds also work well with your dog, but this is just to give you an idea of a few great breeds to consider.

      Best Companion Dogs For Border Collies

      To find the best breeds to act as a companion to your Border collie, it’s a good idea to be aware of tendencies and personalities that match the Border collie. 

      For instance, Borders are known to be very aggressive and intelligent, so you should always seek a companion dog that is equally intelligent and aggressive. 

      Factors to consider include size, gender, and age. For example, if you brought home a smaller puppy, you may find that your Border Collie feels and acts more superior resulting in aggressive behavior from time to time.

      German Shepherd

      German Shepherds are the most recommended breed to pair with a Border Collie due to their also high intellect, work ethic, and obedient personality.

      Not only is this breed energetic, but they can hold their own in the playground and will protect and make other family members feel safe.

      In almost every aspect aside from herding, you will find that German Shepherds closely match up to the character of your Border Collie.

      Australian Shepherd

      Much like the first vet recommended, Border Collies and Australian Shepherds are the perfect matches for herding dogs.

      Both breeds more similarities than differences and naturally both share a high awareness of motion. Both breeds require high amounts of exercise and come with concerns if you plan on buying other breeds.

      Alongside one another they make the perfect couple, but separately with other breeds not so much. Consider an Aussie Shepherd if you would like to add another naturally herding dog to your family.

      That said, it’s best to prepare for regular walks, high-volume outdoor activities, and lots of fun, as owning both of these breeds might be quite the handful.

      Labrador

      Labradors are known to be a type of breed that is very affectionate, active, and confident. They portray the same personality characterized by the Border collie, the more reason why they make a good companion.

      Similar to Golden Retrievers, this breed generally has a happy positive attitude that will encourage other pets to be happy too.

      Labs grow to around 22½ to 24½ inches tall, weigh up to 80lbs for adult males. Safe to say they can not be easily pushed around and are very well known for being intelligent, alert, and pro-active dogs.

      Golden Retriever

      Golden Retrievers are best known for getting along with other dogs, kids, and humans which make them a great candidate for Border Collies.

      After speaking with several professional vets I was able to find that Golden Retrievers have the characteristics that encourage a fun playful environment for all pets in your home.

      Read Also >> Can some Golden Retrievers be Aggressive?

      Belgian Tervuren (Belgian Shepherd)

      This breed is very similar to the German shepherd, but they are bigger in size compared to Border collies. They blend well with collies since they are very affectionate and loving.

      Their intelligence matches that of Border collies, and they have lots of energy and are playful too. Belgian Shepherds are easy to train and love to please, making them easier to manage. 

      english pointer out on the hunt with intense focus and a fun fact Even before the invention of guns, Pointers were used for hunting birds. The dog would be sent out to locate prey, and then the hunter would throw a net over the dog and any birds it had found, as a way of catching them

      English Pointer

      It is so saddening that these unique breeds of dogs are currently declining in popularity. 

      They are very affectionate, intelligent, and also easy to train. They can make the best companion to your Border collie as they are of the same size, and they also require the same amount of playtime as Border collies.

      All these characteristics will enable them to mesh well with your Border collie.

      Standard Poodle

      Unlike miniature poodles and other small dogs, standard poodles will get along with Border collies despite their colossal size. They are perfect as they are known to love playing rough too.

      They are also an intelligent breed of dogs that will be willing and obedient to your border collie. More importantly, just like the Border collie, they are also family dogs.

      Siberian Husky

      While the Siberian Husky will make a perfect companion for your Border Collie, they do not equal up as good to keep around small children. This means considering this breed as a new dog to add to your family may be well worth taking a deep dive into before coming to a conclusion.

      Regardless, the Huskies are very energetic, large in size, and playful, matching the collies perfectly. 

      Boxer

      Just like Border collies, Boxers love to play a lot, are energetic and can hold on to themselves well. They are, however, rebellious regardless of them being an intelligent breed of dogs.

      For the best results, you’ll need to train your boxer for them to match up with your border collie.

      Dalmatian

      Finally, the last breed on our list is the Dalmatian. If you train this dog well, it can be the best match-up for your dog as they are known to be very aggressive. It will, however, require more activity in terms of exercises.

      Unlike Border collies, Dalmatians can decide to be stubborn and troublemakers, but as I said earlier, with good training, they will blend well with all family members.

      Read Also: >> Is Adrienne Farricelli’s Brain training for dogs any good?

      How Do I Stop My Border Collie from Herding Other Dogs?

      One of the best methods that you can use to train your Border Collie is The  Leave method. It is a suitable method because you get the chance to train your dog to your specifications. Here are a few steps that you can try out.

      Present a Treat

      You can consider holding a treat and present it to your Border collie. As he approaches the food, remove your hand slowly and say, “leave it.”

      Reinforce “ Leave it “

      Your Border call will now be active; he will try to investigate what you are holding in your hand. Deny him still and when he stops, provide some playtime or a different treat of higher value. Repeat this process for some time.

      Increase the Temptation

      Your Border collie at this time will be very interested in your offers. Leave treats around your yard or even around the house.  This is the tricky part because you’ll need to command your dog to “leave it.”

      Expose to Targets

      Within your premises, introduce your Border collie to miniature animals or even livestock that he wants to herd. He might be tempted to herd the smaller animals, watch and command him to  “Leave it.”

      Establish “Leave it.”

      Watch your Border collie; if he continues the herding behavior, recall, reprimand, and repeat the whole process. If he responds well and he stops the herding behavior, reward him.

      Frequently Asked Questions

      Are Border Collies Good With Small Dogs?

      Border collies are not good with small dogs. It is advisable to pair them with larger breeds that can handle them on their own. The main reason behind this is because Border collies have been bred as herd animals, and as a result, they want to herd small creatures, including small dogs.

      Can Two Border Collies live together?

      YES! The best companion for a Border collie is another Border collie. As a result of being of the same breed, they have the same size, quick traits, and energy levels. In most cases where you have no time to exercise your Border collie, another Border collie can do that for you perfectly. They will play a lot, and that will be exercising.

      You might, however, need to supervise their play which might otherwise escalate into a fight. Be on the lookout and correct any unnecessary or unwanted behavior.

      Conclusion

      Many breeds tend not to get along with border collies due to their herding background. They are, however, not considered as being the most aggressive dog on the planet.

      If you really need to get a companion for your Border collie, you have to look for an intelligent, energetic breed that works hard and listens well.

      Rachael Summers

      Rachael Summers

      Rachael Summers is the Founder and Senior Editor at Dig Doggy. She is a lifelong canine enthusiast and adores dogs of all shapes and sizes! Rachael also loves iced coffee, hammocks, and puppy-cuddling!

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      Rachael Summers

      Rachael Summers

      Rachael Summers is the Founder and Senior Editor at Dig Doggy. She is a lifelong canine enthusiast and adores dogs of all shapes and sizes! Rachael also loves iced coffee, hammocks, and puppy-cuddling!

      About Dig Doggy

      DigDoggy® is a free resource for dog owners, with everything from expert product reviews to trusted pet care advice.

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