How To Pick A Labradoodle Puppy From A Litter (8-Step Guide)

Want to know how to Pick A Labradoodle Puppy From A Litter? We’ve got you covered!

A new puppy can either become your new best friend or your worst nightmare.

That’s not to mention health problems too.

image of Labradoodle Pups With Mom

There are a few important steps you should follow in order to choose the right puppy for your home. 

In this Digdoggy.com guide you’ll learn:

  • How to match the right Labradoodle puppy to your lifestyle 
  • How to tell the characteristics of a  Labradoodle Puppy
  • Questions to ask the breeder about the puppy 

And much more!

What's In This Guide?

      What Do You Need To Know About Picking A Labradoodle Puppy From A Litter?

      There are 3 main things you need to consider when picking a new dog.

      1. The energy of the dog
      2. Your lifestyle
      3. The culture behind the breed (in your case a Labradoodle)

      In any litter, there are 3 positions within the litter:

      1. Front of the pack (a.k.a Pick of the litter)
      2. Middle of the pack (a.k.a Pet quality)
      3. Back of the pack (a.k.a Run of the litter)

      Front of the pack

      For example, police dogs are always picked from the front of the pack.

      This is the kind of dog that is very quiet, very self-secure which is immediately noticeable as they don’t do a lot of barking.

      But, when they make their move, its a very strong move.

      This is the kind of dog that is usually picked up by an agency. (i.e. competition dogs, police dogs, and show dogs).

      Middle of the pack

      These dogs are naturally the “happy go lucky” and certainly the best for every type of family. They are good for brand new families, families with pets, and households with kids.

      But, if you don’t set rules, barriers and limitations this type of dog can become easily hyperactive (i.e pull, jump or bark and get up to mischieve).

      Nothing aggressive, nothing fearful, but can certainly be disruptive.

      Back of the pack

      The back of the pack will contain dogs that are generally more emotionally sensitive. This is a type of Labradoodle puppy that will develop fear, insecurities, anxiety, and aggression

      How do you identify the position of Labradoodle puppy within the litter?

      When feeding time comes around, you will clearly see:

      • The front of the pack get there first
      • Middle of the pack will get to the mom second
      • Back of the pack will get there last (a.k.a the run of the litter)

      Pay attention to the order as this will help you to clearly identify who is who!

      Energy levels you should be aware of

      Energy levels are broken into 3 categories for dogs

      High energy, medium energy, and low energy. To confuse things more, this can be found within each type of pack.

      This means you could break down ‘front of the pack’ alone into 3 levels of energy and so forth.

      You can use this to identify the type of lifestyle this dog can live which is either city or a farm.

      What lifestyle do you have?

      If you live in the city, middle of the pack and back of the pack Labradoodle puppies will do absolutely perfect.

      If you live on a farm, front the pack Labradoodle puppies will do amazing! This is the kind of dog that will be extremely helpful around a ranch, up the mountains, and generally helpful outdoors.

      If you live on a farm, front of the pack is the best type for you.

      Supplies That You’ll Need To Pick A Labradoodle From A Litter

      • A puppy collar
      • Small leash
      • Dog treat
      • Baby wipes
      • Dog crate (optional)
      • Contract of guarantee
      • Payment for the puppy
      • A second person (To provide an objective view and second opinion)

      Image of a row of seven adorable red 8 weeks young Cobberdog aka Labradoodle puppies, sitting and laying all beside each other. All looking towards camera. Isolated on a white background.

      How To Properly Pick A Labradoodle From A Litter (8-Step Guide)

      Here are the steps for you to properly pick the best Labradoodle in the bunch:

      1. Find a Reputable Breeder
      2. Examine the Entire Litter
      3. Inquire About Genes and Ancestry
      4. Get Vaccination Information
      5. Look For A Friendly Pup
      6. Check The Puppy’s Health
      7. Sign The Written Contracts
      8. Take Your New Puppy Home

      Step 1: Find a Reputable Breeder

      Find a reputable breeder in your community and go to the actual location.

      Observe how healthy and clean the animals are, and the cleanliness and all-over vibe of the place.

      Ask to see their Labradoodles.

      Step 2: Examine the Entire Litter.

      Look at the entire litter and examine each puppy to check for any existing conditions.

      Look for the average-sized pup in the litter.

      Don’t get the weakest, smallest puppy as these tend to have shorter lives and problems with their genes.

      Step 3: Inquire About Genes and Ancestry

      Ask the breeder how old the grandparents and the parents of the puppies are.

      Were there any medical problems? This will give you an idea of what to expect with your own puppies, as well.

      Step 4: Get Vaccination Information

      Ask the breeder about any immunity vaccines that both the mother and the puppies may have gotten.

      Ask for the name of the veterinarian and the dates of injection.

      Inquire if any medications were given to the pups, or any vitamins they are being administered. This way, you can continue the process once you take one of the puppies home.

      Step 5: Look For A Friendly Pup

      Check the litter, find a puppy that is not too timid and a bit friendly.

      The shy, fearful puppies tend to be future biters due to their fear. The ages from six to sixteen weeks are considered prime for socialization.

      Pick a puppy in the age range of six to eight weeks.

      Step 6: Check The Puppy’s Health

      Check any puppy that comes towards you. If it starts to wag its tail then it likes you, too. Check the gums, tongue, and lips.

      If these areas are white and not pink, then the puppy is anemic. If it is a male pup, make sure each testicle has made its descent into the scrotum.

      Puppies that are 6 weeks of age need to have their testicles in place.

      Check for nose or eye discharge. Look into the ears and make sure there are no crusts. Check if the area of its umbilical cord has a bulge, which is a hernia.

      If all these areas are clear, then this is an indication of a healthy puppy. The incubation of common puppy diseases, if any, is around six or more days.

      This means that once purchased, and checked by a vet, your puppy could still develop diseases six days after. This is something your breeder knows.

      Step 7: Sign the Contracts

      Have the vet sign a contract that enables you to have the puppy checked by a vet within forty-eight to seventy-two hours.

      A written statement says that if any congenital or contagious issues are found, you get a full refund and are not given another puppy.

      Include the incubation period of the puppy for any diseases that break out a week after you take the puppy home. Most respectable breeders will have these written documents on hand.

      Step 8: Take Your New Puppy Home

      Once you have decided on the best puppy of the bunch, attach a small collar and a leash to them. Wipe his paws with disinfectant baby wipes.

      Take them to your car. You can also take a small cage with you for them to ride in, while you drive home. 

      A small crate will protect your car from any accidents. Give your puppy a dog treat.

      Final Thoughts on Picking A Labradoodle Puppy From A Litter

      Picking the right Labradoodle puppy involves looking at your lifestyle, energy of the dog, and breed.

      Energy and lifestyle are determined by the position of a pack the puppy is in and their natural level of energy which is categorized into low, medium, and high. 

      This guide shares exactly how to decipher this information and make the right choice. Ensure the breeder is clean, professional, and has all the right documents and contracts for a smooth transaction.

      Jennifer Cosculluela

      Jennifer Cosculluela

      Jennifer Cosculluela graduated magna cum laude in Marketing from the State University of New York’s F.I.T and was a Presidential Scholar, specializing in Shakespearean Studies. She also has an AB Psychology Degree from De La Salle University Bacolod and when not writing, loves to spend time with her daughter Margarita and bake cookies and lasagna for her loving husband Sebastian.

      Learn More About Pet Care​

      Raising a pup shouldn’t at all be hard. Check out some of these other helpful guides to help you become an even better pet parent! 

      Jennifer Cosculluela

      Jennifer Cosculluela

      Jennifer Cosculluela graduated magna cum laude in Marketing from the State University of New York’s F.I.T and was a Presidential Scholar, specializing in Shakespearean Studies. She also has an AB Psychology Degree from De La Salle University Bacolod and when not writing, loves to spend time with her daughter Margarita and bake cookies and lasagna for her loving husband Sebastian.

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