How To Groom A Newfoundland (13-Simple steps)

Want to learn how to groom a Newfoundland dog?

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It is common for Newfoundlands to suffer from skin diseases that leave their coats dull and thin.

A long-distance swimming master like this requires a well-maintained coat that will continue to protect them from even the iciest of waters.

image of well groomed Newfoundland black coated dog

Grooming a Newfoundland is definitely one the most exhausting tasks you’ll ever do. So, today I have brought some tools and tips to reduce the time and effort it takes you to groom this dog.  

In this Digdoggy.com guide, you will learn:

  • Supplies you will need for grooming your Newfoundland
  • How to prepare for grooming your Newfoundland
  • Steps to grooming this dog

And much more!

What's In This Guide?

      What Do You Need To Know About Grooming A Newfoundland dog?

      It is vital that you groom out a Newfoundland pre-bath because without using a high-velocity dryer it is likely you’ll worsen any already damaged hair.

      This helps to loosen the undercoat so you can get to the skin easier when bathing.

      Expect a lot of fur to come away when brushing as this should not be alarming and is completely normal.

      It’s best to start with a de-shedding brush and then go in with a comb and brush to effectively remove tangles and mats.

      Thick areas on the coat indicate where you should focus on most as you’ll find they are highly matted and tangled. Spend more time here and go in with a de-shedding brush or pin comb for best results.

      Get an assistant if possible to help get her into the tub and double shampoo with a deep conditioner for best results.

      It may also be easier to groom paws with your dog laying on the ground as listing their feet up for long periods of time can be exhausting.

      Preferably get your hands on a low grooming table or surface that you can use which makes it extremely easy to get a large breed ready for a session.

      How Often Should You Groom Your Newfoundland?

      Bathe your Newfie every 2 weeks at most and at the very least every 8 weeks for a full grooming session which includes bath, brush, trim, etc.

      A dirty coat will cause the shaft of his hair to break down and become extremely damaged and rough.

      Weekly brushing is necessary to prevent tangles and mats. Cobweb matting is the result of going too long between brushing.

      Supplies You’ll Need For Grooming A Newfoundland

      • Grooming table
      • Deshedding brush
      • Shampoo
      • Conditioner
      • Prima Bathing System (optional)
      • Facial Cleanser
      • Degreaser
      • Ear Cleaner
      • Ear Pads
      • Towel
      • Hair Clipper
      • Scissors
      • Thinning Shears
      • A mask (to avoid breathing in fur and dander)

      Image of black Newfoundland dog standing straight showign his cot with a fun fact that says: Newfoundlands were originally bred as working dogs, primarily serving as rescue and service dogs on fisherman ships. While they rarely serve as ship hands anymore, their expert swimming abilities are still alive and well.

      Step 1: Use a Deshedding Brush To Remove All Excess Shed Hair

      Place your Newfie on a grooming table.

      Take a de-shedding brush such as the kind by Chris Christensen and begin brushing in downward strokes starting from the neck and down to the body.

      Brush down each paw, ears, and tail. Brush head. Then remove and dispose of all the fur that the de-shedding brush removes. Follow this with a comb for even more detangling.

      Step 2: Apply Shampoo and Water Through fur

      Take a bit of shampoo in a nozzle spray such as the kind that the Prima Bathing System uses and apply this through your Newfoundland’s fur.

      With your hand, loosen up his double coat and spread the shampoo throughout his entire fur. This gets into all the nooks and crannies of his coat while he is still dry.

      If you don’t have a Prima Bathing System, apply the shampoo and water with a squirt bottle similar to the kind they use for mustard at the deli.

      This helps spread the shampoo right into the roots of his fur. Apply the shampoo starting from his neck, legs, paws, tail without wetting his head.

      Step 3: Brush The Wet Fur

      While his fur is wet with lather, take a brush and brush his hair downwards. Start from his side and work downwards.

      Do both his left and his right side. Brush down his legs and paws. Leave his head dry for now.

      Step 4: Wash Face With Face Cleanser For Dogs

      Take a facial cleanser for dogs and apply this with a loofah to his face. Start with his forehead, cheeks, and each of his ears. Avoid his eyes, nose, and mouth

      Step 5: Rinse Off And Apply Conditioner

      Rinse the shampoo off your Newfoundland. Dilute conditioner with a ratio of 2 to 1. Apply the diluted conditioner all over his body.

      Step 6: Apply Degreaser On His Feet

      Use a loofah and apply degreaser on each paw. Follow the directions on the Degreaser bottle.

      Step 7: Rinse-Off His Entire Body

      Rinse off the conditioner, facial cleanser, and degreaser all in one go. Be careful to avoid all his sensitive parts.

      Step 8: Clean Ears

      Use ear cleaner and ear pads to clean each ear. Wipe each inner ear. Follow the directions on the ear cleaning solutions of your choice.

      step 9: Towel Dry the Body

      Use a towel to dry your Newfoundland. Squeeze off the moisture in his tail.

      Step 10: Brush Down Fur Again

      Take the same de-shedding brush and brush out his undercoat while his hair is damp

      Step 11: Dry Fur With A Hair Dryer

      Dry his coat using a hairdryer for dogs. While his fur is being blow-dried, use a brush to fluff his hair.

      Step 12: Trim The Hair On His Paws, Tail, And Ears.

      With a hair clipper, trim each paw. Trim his footpads. Remove all the overly long fur that has grown on his footpads.

      Use a hair clipper and scissors alternately.

      Trim the excess hair on his tail. Trim the hair on the edge of his ears carefully with scissors.

      Step 13: Use Thinning Shears On Any Area With Thickened Fur

      Take a pair of thinning shears and trim off any parts of your doggo that have thickened fur. Do a final full-body brushing to get rid of all the cut hair.

      Final Thoughts On Grooming A Newfoundland

      Work your way slowly through each part of his body, making sure to penetrate into his fur completely.

      Groom every 2 to 8 weeks minimum and use an assistant that will prove to be helpful with getting your dog onto a grooming table or into a tub.

      Jennifer Cosculluela

      Jennifer Cosculluela

      Jennifer Cosculluela graduated magna cum laude in Marketing from the State University of New York’s F.I.T and was a Presidential Scholar, specializing in Shakespearean Studies. She also has an AB Psychology Degree from De La Salle University Bacolod and when not writing, loves to spend time with her daughter Margarita and bake cookies and lasagna for her loving husband Sebastian.

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      Jennifer Cosculluela

      Jennifer Cosculluela

      Jennifer Cosculluela graduated magna cum laude in Marketing from the State University of New York’s F.I.T and was a Presidential Scholar, specializing in Shakespearean Studies. She also has an AB Psychology Degree from De La Salle University Bacolod and when not writing, loves to spend time with her daughter Margarita and bake cookies and lasagna for her loving husband Sebastian.

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