Top 7 Best Shock Collars For Hunting Dogs (2022 Review)

If you’re searching for the best dog hunting shock collar, you’ve come to the right place!

In this Digdoggy.com guide, you’ll learn:

  • The top 5 E-collars for hunting
  • Must-have features for an E-collar being used in the field
  • The different types of stimulus modes that varying devices offer

And much more!

Beautiful Drathaar dog with electric shock collar for controlling, training outdoors on a green meadow at summer day. A German hound looks into distance. A portrait of a large breed of hunting dogs.

Training a dog to hunt duck, pheasant, and quale is hard enough, especially when training is done from a distance. A shock collar can be an effective training tool to provide you with total control for a 1/2 mile to 1-mile range of field.

But with a variety of shock collars on the market, finding the best collar for hunting can prove to be a difficult task.

After testing over 30 E-collars with varying breeds, I decided to share my experience by compiling a list of the best training devices to assist a dog in the field.

And if you’ve never trained a dog but always wanted to have a hunting dog, then hopefully this post will give you the confidence to get started.

Keep reading to discover my top recommended E-collars for hunting dogs.

ImageProduct
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Garmin Delta Sport XC
  • 2 Types of stimulation (momentary and continuous)
  • Rechargeable lithium-ion batteries in both handheld and dog devices
  • 1/2 mile Range of frequency
  • 2 Types of stimulation (momentary and continuous)
  • Rechargeable lithium-ion batteries in both handheld and dog devices
  • 1/2 mile Range of frequency
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Garmin Pro 550 plus
  • 2.5 Seconds update rate to provide your dog's location
  • 18 levels of continuous and momentary stimulation
  • Capable of training up to 3 dogs at once
  • 2.5 Seconds update rate to provide your dog's location
  • 18 levels of continuous and momentary stimulation
  • Capable of training up to 3 dogs at once
View on Amazon
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D.T System: R.A.P.T. 1450
  • Expandable for training up to 3-dogs
  • 1 - 16 levels of stimulus
  • Rechargeable & Waterproof
  • Expandable for training up to 3-dogs
  • 1 - 16 levels of stimulus
  • Rechargeable & Waterproof
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Dogtra T&B Dual Long Range
  • Dual rheostat dials and buttons for training 2 dogs at once
  • 1.5 Mile range of frequency
  • 127 stimulus levels, adjustable pitch levels, and fully waterproof
  • Dual rheostat dials and buttons for training 2 dogs at once
  • 1.5 Mile range of frequency
  • 127 stimulus levels, adjustable pitch levels, and fully waterproof
View on Amazon
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SportDOG SportHunter 825
  • 7 levels of static stimulation
  • 1/2 Mile (880 yards) Can train up to three dogs at a time 
  • Charges in 2 hours and lasts 50-70 hours per charge
  • 7 levels of static stimulation
  • 1/2 Mile (880 yards) Can train up to three dogs at a time 
  • Charges in 2 hours and lasts 50-70 hours per charge
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Garmin Sport PRO
  • 10 Levels of intensity
  • Range up to ¾ mile 
  • Water-resistant rating of IPX7 (i.e. can be submerged in 1 meter of water for 30 minutes)
  • 10 Levels of intensity
  • Range up to ¾ mile 
  • Water-resistant rating of IPX7 (i.e. can be submerged in 1 meter of water for 30 minutes)
View on Amazon
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Dogtra 1900 Series
  • 127 stimulation levels
  • Range of ¾ mile
  • Backlit LED screen
  • 127 stimulation levels
  • Range of ¾ mile
  • Backlit LED screen
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What's In This Guide?

Our Top 7  Shock Collars For Dog Hunting

  1. Garmin Delta Sport XC (Best Overall)
  2. Garmin Pro 550 plus (Best For Professional Hunters & GPS Tracking)
  3. D.T System: R.A.P.T. 1450 (Best For Upland Hunting and Training)
  4. Dogtra T&B Dual Long Range (Best For training 2 dogs)
  5. SportDOG SportHunter 825 (Best for range)
  6. Garmin Sport PRO (Best 550 Plus Alternative)
  7. Dogtra 1900 Series (Best Garmin Sport PRO alternative)

The Best 7 Shock Collars For Hunting Dogs Reviewed

When choosing the right E-collar for a hunting dog, it’s crucial to ask:

  • How far is the range of the field you’ll be hunting in?
  • Is a GPS tracking component likely to be a feature you will need?
  • Are you training or hunting with multiple dogs at once?
  • What modes of training will you need for your training style? (i.e. beep, tone, vibrate, static shock)
  • Would a device with a range be required to discharge the appropriate level of stimulation for your dog?

We compared the top 7 products in the market to give you the good, the bad, and the ugly of each of them. Enjoy!

Pick #1: Garmin Delta Sport XC

Garmin offers a range of training collars for hunting and the Delta Sport XC comes as no exception.

The device has 2 types of stimulation that consist of ‘momentary’ and ‘continuous’ shock that can both be used to achieve the desired result in different ways.

When the continuous mode is used, the correction stays on for a preset duration of an estimated 8 to 8.5 seconds. So when a dog is instructed to carry out a command, the stimulation will stay on until the task is performed or the collar times out.

The momentary function is also set to operate for a preset duration but will stay on for a much shorter period of around a 25th of a second (25000 milliseconds).

This means that in order to continue the process, the trainer must repeat the correction, usually in a rhythmic cadence (tap – tap – tap) until the dog begins to perform the task. 

Both are very effective and are better suited to particular dogs depending on their response. So it’s best to gauge how a dog responds to better decide on the most suitable methods for training moving forward.

Pros

Cons

Pick #2: Garmin Pro 550 plus

This is probably the most used collar among training professionals such as police, hunters, military, and protection dogs.

The pro 550 plus combines the training features from Garmins PRO series training devices but also incorporates a simple tracking interface for hunting.

This model is the next generation of Garmins flagship 550 series which is widely used by professional dog trainers across the country. And if you’re familiar with the 550 system, then you’ll be thrilled to see a new digital tracking display on the transmitter.

The new tracking component provides you with complete tracking information by helping you to gauge the estimated distance of the dog in feet.

Up to 3 dogs can be trained at once and interchanged between to utilize specifically programmed settings for each collar via the toggle switch on the remote.

In the event that your dog stops, a small dot will appear in the top left-hand corner to indicate a sign of ‘no movement’. The TT 15 dog device comes with a 1″ thick collar, has a range of 2 miles connectivity, and comes already paired together, so you just turn it on and you’re ready to go. 

This device is also compatible with the T 5 training collar, Garmins vehicle-based tracking systems, and the Garmin Forerunner (and Pheonix) smartwatch to enhance your tracking capabilities.

There are two GPS antennas on the TT 15 that updates with your dog’s location every 2.5 seconds. For the most accurate reception, you should always make sure the antenna rides over your dog’s neck. You want to make sure you have a good GPS connection before you put the collar on the dog. 

The collar light will flash 3 times in green when you have the optimal GPS signal. The second antenna is made of rugged aircraft cable and is responsible for transmitting your dog’s location to the PRO 550 plus handheld remote as well as also used for corrections. 

Pros

Cons

Pick #3: D.T System: R.A.P.T. 1450

The D.T. R.A.P.T. 1450 is the perfect collar for upland dog trainers and hunters, as the unique grip transmitter design provides maximum hand mobility to easily and efficiently make faster corrections.

The wrap strap keeps the transmitter remote securely fitted on the hand, and has a rapid access button on top of the device that can be easily programmed to beep, locate, nick, vibrate, or continuously shock.

The device also has a ‘no shock’ alternative stimulus that uses a 360˚ FM transmission and integrated collar antenna for positive signal reception no matter the conditions. 

This technology provides the R.A.P.T training device with a 1400-yard range and features the new compound coupling antenna for easier use and long-term durability.

In order to maintain a safe and effective training stimulus, D.T. has manufactured the transmitter with 16 levels of static stimulation that can be quickly adjusted via the easy-to-turn rheostatic dial. 

You can also mount D.T.’s top mount beeper horn to the collar which is audible for 450 yards and has a removable beeper cap that can be removed to reduce sound levels. 

Pros

Cons

Pick #4: dogtra T&B Dual Long Range

The T&B Dual by Dogtra is manufactured with two rheostat dials and buttons that are dedicated to each dog collar for training.

This allows you to get everything set before entering the field to prevent miscorrections and enhance efficiency when training.

Each of the dials is color-coordinated and corresponds with the associated collar, which means orange dials for orange collars, and green dials for green collars.

Nick and constant are on the top buttons on both sides with vibrate in the middle and the locate button at the bottom.

The Dogtra T&B Dual also has 127 stimulation levels, adjustable pitch levels, IPX9K waterproof ratings, and a 1.5-mile range.

Pros

Cons

Pick #5: SportDOG SportHunter 825

The SportDOG SportHunter is the big brother of the 425 (that had a 500-yard range) and has a 1/2-mile range of frequency that can train up to three individual dogs on a single handheld remote.

The tone and vibration modes are set on the dial which allows you to have both functions at the same time in several different mode setups.

SportDOG collars provide you the option to adjust stimulation levels on the collar itself, which is a 3 mode function that changes the stimulus output on the collar (low, medium, or high).

This device is made to fit dogs with a 5 – 22″ neck size and has a battery life that lasts for a maximum of 70 hours including a low light battery indicator on the handheld device. The company is well known for excellent customer service and for guaranteeing its products against defects.

Pros

Cons

Pick #6: Garmin Sport PRO

The Garmin Sport PRO has a fantastic price point at under $200 giving you most of the features found in the Garmin 550 Plus (product #2 on the list).

This includes searchlights, vibration, tone, and 10 momentary or continuous stimulation levels.

The device is expandable for training up to 3 dogs over a ¾ mile range in comparison to the Garmin 550 Plus which provides you with frequency for a full 1-mile.

The biggest difference between this collar to the Garmin 550 Plus is that it doesn’t have the low, medium, and high features for stimulation delivery. However, at the price point of under 200 dollars, you get exceptional value for money with this product.

A range of accessories is also available for this device including lanyards, holsters, clips, and contact points along with a built-in bark limiter just like the 550 providing adequate features for around 95% of hunters.

When you pick up the handheld device it feels dense, thick, and of high quality with blind operation dials and buttons that are easily memorized for use in low light conditions.

Pros

Cons

Pick #7: Dogtra 1900 Series

The Dogtra 1900S is in my opinion a direct competitor to the Garmin Sport PRO E-training device (product no #6 on this list).

This device has a tremendous amount of power, with correctional levels ranging from 0 to 127 administered through momentary (nick), continuous power, and a vibrate (pager function) for recall.

Unlike the Garmin Sport PRO, the 1900S has no searchlight and no tone. I feel the rheostatic dial and durability of the handheld device could be improved as it takes almost two full revolutions to go from levels 0 to 127, and feels slightly fragile when compared to similarly priced competitors.

But while difficult, with practice you can learn to operate the dial with one hand to improve efficiency in the field. The handheld transmitter has textured side panels with easy-to-access buttons and a backlit LCD screen to depict the current stimulus level and battery life.

Both the handheld and collar devices contain rapid charge batteries that are fully charged within 2 hours giving you a ¾ mile range when operating. The receiving collar is also fully waterproof and has plastic insulated contact points to prevent power loss in water.

As the collar weighs an entire 7lbs, I would recommend this for use with dogs that are at least 15lbs.

Pros

Cons

What is a Shock Collar For Hunting Dogs?

A shock collar for hunting dogs has no additional functions to what you would find in a regular E-collar used for dog obedience training.

The differences between what would be classed as a regular E-collar and an E-training device (used in the field) are in the quality of build, reliability, effectiveness, waterproof capabilities, range, and ease of operation.

A regular training collar can be used with one hand, two hands, or no hands when paired with a wireless dog fence. However, for hunting, you’ll usually need a free hand (to hold a gun) with the ability to quickly make changes via one-handed operations.

The majority of hunters will use E-collars for cadence, proofing, and correctional type training. Each has its benefits but is totally dependent on the style of training being implemented.

For example, rough terrain along with rainwater, mud, and strong winds will naturally require a good grip, quick change of operation, and long-lasting battery life.

Let’s check out the all-important features to look out for!

What Should You Look For In An Effective Shock Collar For Hunting Dogs? 

Below are the most important features and qualities to consider when buying an E-collar for the purpose of training a dog to hunt.

And while you may not find a collar with every feature below, it’s still good to understand the best-suited functions for hunting or upland training.

Range

Probably the most important factor, “range”, is likely the first thing to consider, and a 1/2 mile range is perfect to begin hunting with.

It’s likely you’ll be training outdoors and over long distances, so you’ll need an adequate range in order to maintain total control over your dog.  

Consider using a map (or GPS these days!) to gauge the size of the field where you’ll be hunting and decide on the best suitable for your device.

GPS Tracking Component

When out in the field, it’s likely you’ll lose sight of the dog when they’re in high drive energy hunting ducks, rabbits, deer, and pheasant. A built-in tracking component will provide you with distance and in some products, the direction for the location of a receiving collar using a beep or image on an LCD screen.

This feature is commonly found in Dogtra devices (which uses a beep that’s audible for 450 yards) and Garmin devices (products no #1, #2, and #6 on our list) where a tracking component is mounted to the handheld remote.

Multi-dog system

Just as the name suggests a multi-dog training device will allow you to control multiple collars at once. However, if you’re searching for a one-handed operation then ensure the transmitter includes a dual function.

But be careful, as many devices are advertised as being ‘multi-functional’ but will still require you to manually switch from one collar to another as opposed to distributing commands to both collars at once.

2 – 4 Mode System (varying stimulation Types)

The three types of stimulation that are generally manufactured into E-collars include:

  1. Tone – Can be used for recall training
  2. Beep – Used for an out of sight dog and beeps every 5 to 10 seconds
  3. Vibration – Also useful for recall
  4. Electric shock – Used for correctional training

Naturally, each dog is unique and requires various levels of stimulus, depending on the thickness of your hunting dog’s skin and fur, as well as their disposition. 

It’s important to start with the lowest stimulation level while training so you can figure out an optimal stimulation level for your dog. 

Keep in mind that you can seek out collars with higher stimulation levels to provide you with more flexibility should your dog become desensitized to lower levels.

I have noticed that some collars fail to have “tone” which is particularly useful for recall. So if you aspire to train with a tone, then it’s best to look out for a product that includes the feature. The only product on our list that does not include tone is the Dogtra 1900S (no #7).

Multi-level Stimulation

Multi stimulation levels are particularly useful for deciding on the best level of intensity for hunting. Naturally, a dog in high drive or in water will require a higher level of correction, especially in the event of a chase.

There is no hard rule for perfect range but instead, I would recommend that you go wide. So the bigger the range, the more freedom you have to play with.

Waterproof Capability

Since you’re going to be training outdoors, you’ll need a robust, durable collar that is waterproof (particularly for water retrieving dogs), or at least water-resistant, especially if your dog runs over puddles and is likely to get wet. 

Welcome, Biothane! Your best friend in the form of a material that offers a range of vibrant colors and fantastic properties such as water capabilities that are suited for the outdoors. More on that shortly.

Rechargeable Batteries

Obvious, and hugely beneficial. Having a device with rechargeable batteries will allow you to contribute to producing less waste while enjoying repeat sessions in the field (with a charge-and-play device).

It’s important to note that you should consider a fast-charging unit for the best results and efficiency. The particular type of rechargeable batteries I would recommend is ‘lithium Ion‘, as they can deliver up to 3.6 Volts which is on average three times higher than relative technologies.

Low-Battery Indicator

Low battery indicators are usually fitted to the receiving collar and presented in colors consisting of red (for low battery), amber (running low), and green (fully charged). This feature is commonly found across Garmin and Dogtra products.

pointer wearing a E-collar

Are shock collars good for hunting dogs?

Shock collars are extremely effective for training hunting dogs to perform tasks and carry out commands. Training a dog to hunt requires constant communication and a high level of obedience that can easily be achieved with reliable recall training.

It’s important to note that a dog must first be able to carry out the command without the use of a collar before incorporating an E-training device into training.

What can I use instead of a shock collar To train a Hunting Dog?

There are many ways to train a dog without the use of a shock collar such as using a leash, long line (similar to rope), clicker, stuffed animals, training treats, beacons, and clear open space.

Note that shock collars are used as reinforcement of already trained commands, and should never be the first point of call for training a dog to hunt.

Why do hunting dogs have orange collars?

BioThane Coated Webbing with the orange coloring is used to give a dog collar maximum visibility by being reflective and conspicuous amongst trees, bushes, water, and so forth.

Orange is a safe and warm color that stands out for safety and looks good. Biothane is also easy to clean, flexible, abrasion-resistant, waterproof, does not hold odors, and highly durable, making it the perfect alternative to leather.

Do shock collars work on fearful dogs?

The short answer is yes, but every dog is different. Some dogs may respond well to a shock collar and become less fearful over time, while others may find the experience traumatizing. The key is to start with low levels of stimulation and gradually increase the intensity if needed. 

It’s also important to keep training sessions short and positive so that your dog associates the collar with good things.

What are the drawbacks of using a shock collar for hunting dogs?

Despite the many benefits of using an E-collar, here are a few reasons why they might not be a great option.

  • Shock Collars can lead to stress in dogs 
  • Dogs can suffer emotional imbalances from overcorrections 
  • Contact points can damage the skin if the collar is fitted too tight 
  • Can be counterproductive with particular dogs causing anxiety, fear, and aggression 

Conclusion

Humane, effective, and perfect for high-distraction situations, shock collars are a great way to train a hunting dog. We reviewed the best 7 E-training devices on the market and compared each of the features to help you make an easy decision on the right unit for you.

All of the products we chose include rechargeable batteries, at least a 1/2 mile range, waterproof capability, and varying types of stimulation (i.e. modes) consisting of beep, vibrate and shock.

I challenge you to find a better text-based resource than this around shock collars for hunting dogs.

Leon Angus

Leon Angus

Leon Angus is a London, UK-based blogger with a plan to improve the pet industry one post at a time. He is the senior editor at Dig Doggy and oversees every piece of content before publish to ensure the highest quality and most thorough research has been carried out.

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Leon Angus

Leon Angus

Leon Angus is a London, UK-based blogger with a plan to improve the pet industry one post at a time. He is the senior editor at Dig Doggy and oversees every piece of content before publish to ensure the highest quality and most thorough research has been carried out.

About Dig Doggy

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All of our reviews and recommendations are based on unbiased research by our editorial team. Read more about us.

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